Rayne Shoes Logo
  • 1950s Rayne Shoe

    Rayne Evening Shoe 1950’s

  • Wedgewood Heel Sandal. 1970s

    Wedgewood Heel Sandal 1970’s

  • Sketches Various Rayne Styles. 1940s

    Sketches Various Rayne Styles. 1940’s

  • 1960s Rayne Shoe

    1960's Rayne Shoe

  • 1960s Rayne Shoe

    1960's Rayne Shoe

  • 1960s Rayne Shoe

    1960's Rayne Shoe

  • 1960s Rayne Shoe

    1960's Rayne Shoe

During the 1950s Rayne produced classic styling that perfectly matched the rigid dress codes of the day. Throughout this period, Rayne collaborated with many famous couturiers like Hardy Amies, Norman Hartnell, & John Cavanagh as well as the celebrated shoe designer Roger Vivier.

Times were changing and so did Rayne. Mary Quant designed her first leather stacked stiletto and Shirley Temple-style ankle-straps for Rayne in 1960. Later she was commissioned to design her own range, along with other young British designers such as Jean Muir and Gerald McCann, to produce collections in synch with the Swinging Sixties. Rayne made sure that alongside the sophisticated styling for one generation there was sufficient fashion and frivolity for the next.

In the 1970’s, Bill Gibb designed collections for Rayne. And Rayne still supplied the shoes for several leading French couturiers houses such as Lanvin and Nina Ricci. In the 1980’s Bruce Oldfield designed collections for Rayne.

The Rayne shoe archive is now spread amongst the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, the Bata shoe museum in Toronto, and the Royal Collections at Buckingham Palace and Kensington Palace in London.